Tech-less Tuesday: Resource Roundup!

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Hello everyone!

Happy Tech-less Tuesday! Today, I am sharing with you Resource Roundup, an activity that I spoke about briefly in a previous post. I created this to help students become aware of all the tools and resources around the room to help them become successful independent learners!

If you’re like me, you’re prepping your back to school lessons, decorations, and organizing everything to get ready for September! Seriously – we don’t get all summer off, we take at least all of August to plan, right? I’m going to share with you this Resource Roundup activity to help students recognize the scaffolds around the room to support them.

Resource Roundup will allow students to explore the room, manipulatives, and any tools you may have to help them be independently successful throughout the year. This is a great way to discuss the various topics that will be covered and will give you an insight as to what the students already know of the resources.

This is a Jig-Saw activity that I will use within the first few days of school. Students will have a “Home” group and an “Master” group. In their master groups, they will explore the resource they are assigned. They will discuss and take notes on the graphic organizer I created answering a few questions about the resource. When they return to their home group, they will share their findings.

The activity can be altered to fit your students of course! The worksheet can be a center time activity, a whole class activity, or an independent activity. Just be sure to give students 15-20 minutes to browse the room and see what they can find to help them be successful. Again, the way you use this activity is up to you!

Some of the resources I am having students examine are fraction manipulatives, base ten blocks, the rubrics we use and success criteria, math dictionaries and word wall, measurement tools, unit cubes, and counters. I will also allow them to walk around and look at the posters and anchor charts that may help them understand more.

An extension for this activity I am planning to do is to have each home group create a poster or advertisement of the resources. You can have them all choose one, you can assign each group a different resource, or you can have them advertise for all five resources – the possibilities are endless!

When I do this activity, I will have each group advertise one resource (assigned by me) on a poster and hang them around the room for the year so students can be reminded that they have plenty of resources to utilize before me. This is a great way to have student work up and to remind you to use the manipulatives in your lessons!

In my TpT store, you’ll find Resource Roundup, which comes with the following:

  • Lesson Plan
  • Resource Roundup Graphic Organizer
  • Assignment Checklist
  • Teacher Assessment Checklist
  • Extension Activity

How do you introduce the resources of your classroom to your students? Drop a comment below & let me know! 🙂

☆Alexandra☆

Tech-less Tuesday: Study Guides 101

Hello Everyone!

 So I know this blog is mainly about technology and math, but let’s be honest, sometimes good ol’ pen and paper gets the job done! Today I am going to share with you the study guides I give to my kids to help them prepare for chapter tests. At my school, we use the GoMath curriculum, so my study guides are loosely based off each chapter. At the end of this post there is a study guide freebie waiting for you! Let’s start with the basics…

What is a study guide?

 A study guide is a tool that I typically give to my students towards the end of each chapter to help them review for the post-test. There are so many ways you can use the study guides though – in centers, before the chapter to assess for prior knowledge, and as a mid-chapter check.

Why give a study guide?

 I know some of you are probably thinking – why give the students a study guide? I’ll let you in on a secret – it’s for the parents. Think about it, most parents know how to do the math, but breaking it down step by step can be difficult. I create these study guides to help parents be more involved in their child’s learning. They also give parents a heads-up as to when a test will be to help get their child ready.

 How do you create a study guide?

 When I am creating a study guide, I think about each lesson in the chapter and how I can explain it in a different way if needed. I use PowerPoint to create most of my worksheets, and then save them as a PDF to upload. I like to work with PowerPoint instead of Word because the text boxes snap nicely into place and you have more leeway with object placement. I set up my study guides in four quadrants. This helps me to put more information on the one-page front to back. The front of the study guide usually has the conceptual understanding of the content. The back has the algorithms and an example or two for students to try on their own.

When do you give a study guide?

I used to give the study guides at the end of the chapter, with a few days to look it over and ask me questions before the test, however I am going to start giving them in the beginning of the unit. I’m hoping it will motivate students and keep them engaged by gaining a sneak preview of the chapter. This will also help parents be more involved in their child’s school work because they will have guidance as to how to help them.

 What are your thoughts about study guides? What other ways do you use them in your classroom? Drop a comment below!

As promised, heres a free study guide aligned to Grade 5 Go Math Chapter 5.

You can find more in my TpT store!

Enjoy!

☆Alexandra☆