Prodigy Game – Engagement & Data Goldmine!

Hi Everyone!

My first official post was about the five tech tools I use in my classroom regularly. One of the programs I use daily is Prodigy Game. This game is a great way to assess how students are doing in skills and standards and it shows the data in a clear and concise way. It’s not your typical math online assessment – it’s disguised as a Role Playing Game where students have a character, collect gems, and battle each other. My students are always so excited when it’s their turn to use Prodigy on the computers during center time.

First, when students login or create an account, they take a placement test. The test is the game, so they are still battling each other as they are answering questions, but it’s the placement test in disguise. When this is done you’ll get a report emailed to you. This is a great way to get a baseline to help you group your students based on the skills they are strong in and skills they need to work on. The placement test is given a few times throughout year – The skills are broken down by standard strand and the baseline report will look like this:

This is a good way to get a general overview of the class. When you scroll over the bubbles you will see the list of students who were that grade level in the domain row, or overall placement. From this page, you can go into the individual student reports to determine the skills they need to work on.

From this, if you click on the “Reports” tab on the left side, you will see the various reports from the data and it will look like this:

The reports that I use most often are the progress and student usage reports. I have a “Prodigy Player of the Week” in each of my classes and choose a student who uses it the most at home and answers the most questions. This gives students an incentive to play at home and make proper use of the time they have to play in class.

The best part about this game is that it’s completely free! Parents can buy a membership for their child for added bonuses such as a membership box, but there is no extra cost for the teacher! Several of my students have memberships, but it doesn’t effect the questions they answer and how many battles they see. Members receive a membership box monthly in the game that gives students gems and various items for the game.

What games do you play in your classroom to boost student engagement?

Alexandra